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Graduate Studies

Engineering grad student wins first-ever GradFlix at McMaster

An image from a GradFlix video

The virtual red carpet was rolled out for our inaugural McMaster GradFlix Final Showcase. Graduate researchers from across the university have been busy crafting one-minute videos to describe their research. GradFlix submissions ranged from animated shorts to on-screen action, and featured creative scripts complemented by original music and film work. On March 30, an audience […]

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Graduate student choice of non-numeric grades or withdrawal for 2020 Winter Term courses

Senate recently approved two transcript final assessment options in addition to traditional (numeric/letter) grades for courses completed at the end of the Winter 2020 term. These additional options may provide relief to students who passed their course but are unhappy with their final grade (Pass = P), or those who did not pass (No Credit […]

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Take the U21/PwC Innovation Challenge

Six graduate students stand against a white board, watching one of the group speak

Apply your academic knowledge to real-world situations in the U21/PwC Innovation Challenge! McMaster PhD and Masters students (course- and research-based) have an opportunity to showcase their critical thinking skills and share their ideas with leaders in graduate career development – PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) and its clients – in this online competition. For all the details, visit […]

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Tell your research story in the 2020 Three Minute Thesis Competition

Could you explain years of research in just three minutes? That’s the challenge for graduate students at McMaster’s 2020 Three Minute Thesis Competition, happening March 18 to 19. Competitors will present their research – and its wider impact – to a panel of non-specialist judges from campus and broader Hamilton communities. Participants have just 180 […]

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Disability-related issues are the topic at McMaster’s Employee Accessibility Network

McMaster employees with disabilities or who have medical accommodations are welcome to join the Employee Accessibility Network Ð a space for faculty, instructors, teaching and research assistants, and staff to connect and discuss disability-related issues.The network holds regular meetings, where topics range from barriers to accessible teaching and learning environments, to supports for TAs and sessional instructors with disabilities in the classroom, to career advancement.Most meetings have a mix of peer support, group goal-setting, consultation and advocacy. They take place on McMaster’s main campus, but network members who are off-site can teleconference or access meetings through a webinar.As well, the network functions as a consultative group to the McMaster Accessibility Council.So if you are a TA or RA whoexperiences disability, disablement, chronic illness, or a health, mental health or addiction concern;has questions or concerns about accessibility in teaching and learning environments; oris interested in meeting in a confidential setting to share information, resources and offer suggestions for enhancing accessibility at McMasteryou are invited to join the network.To join the network’s mailing list, attend an upcoming meeting, or ask related questions, send aconfidential emailto Kate Brown, AccessMac Program, Equity and Inclusion Office:access@mcmaster.caMeetings are hosted by the Equity and Inclusion Office, in response to provincial accessibility legislation. […]

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Volunteer as a research associate at McMaster’s Research Shop

cartoon man in button-down shirt, tie and black pants holds a clipboard with a checklist on it.

Student volunteers are needed to work with public, non-profit, and community organizations on research projects over the summer. Being a research associate is an excellent opportunity to develop and apply your graduate research skills. Volunteers would be part of a team of McMaster student research associates working with organizations to refine their research questions, then […]

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Apply now for IUSRS: invaluable experience for students, supervisors

Applications are now open for the the Indigenous Undergraduate Summer Research Scholarship (IUSRS) program.The IUSRS is heading into its third year, providing an opportunity for students Ð and McMaster faculty members Ð to be immersed in a unique research experience. In 2017, approximately 15 Indigenous undergraduate students will be accepted into the program.For more information about the program and to apply,visit the IUSRS online.Chelsea Gabel, Acting Director of McMaster’s Indigenous Research Institute and assistant professor in the Faculty of Social Sciences, supervised five visiting Indigenous Summer Scholars during the two-year pilot program, beginning in 2015.Invaluable experience for students”As an Indigenous scholar, I felt that it was very important to mentor, train, and better prepare Indigenous undergraduate students” she says. “The IUSRS is an opportunity to get them excited and interested in graduate school.â?Gabel describes her IUSRS supervisory experience as transformative, a description she hopes is shared by her former IUS Scholars.”This is a program that facilitates mentorship and training. It enables students to make more informed choices as they prepare for graduate school.â?Applications are now open for McMaster faculty researchers who are interested in supervising an Indigenous undergraduate student this summer. Please visit the School of Graduate Studies< > for more information and to complete an online application.Invaluable experience for faculty supervisorsAs a supervisor, Gabel says she was forced to think about issues in ways she hadn’t previously, thanks to the expertise and knowledge brought by the IUS Scholars. The provocative and insightful questions often changed how she thought about a particular issue.Gabel says a program like the IUSRS would have been a benefit to her during her undergraduate degree.”Having a relationship and being mentored by faculty would have been so beneficial for me. Mentorship often isn’t present in an undergraduate environment” Gabel says.”Research often involves group work, more in-depth interactions with colleagues, and improved communication skills. This program provides opportunities for students to learn to work as a member of a research team.â?She adds that it also provides an opportunity to improve writing, communication and presentation skills Ð all necessary tools for success at the graduate level.The 2017 IUSRS program runs from May 23 to July 21.Please visit the School of Graduate Studies for more information and to apply. […]

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Volunteer as a research associate at McMaster’s Research Shop

cartoon man in button-down shirt, tie and black pants holds a clipboard with a checklist on it.

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Join a team of McMaster graduate student research associates. Volunteer at the McMaster Research Shop!
The McMaster Research Shop works with public, non-profit, and community organizations in and beyond Hamilton to provide plain-language answers to their research questions. Research teams work with organizations to refine their research questions, then prepare rapid research reviews. The reviews are short plain-language reports Ð 10 to 20 pages.
Why volunteer?

Enhance the transferability of your academic research skills by responding to a community-identified question or need.
Explore possibilities for employment inside and outside the university.
Make connections with Hamilton community organizations.
Build your CV and portfolio by co-authoring a research report with teammates and a community partner.
Learn and practice research methodologies from other academic disciplines.
Work with graduate students from other departments.
Earn a Certificate or Statement of Professional Learning upon project completion.

What will you do?

Work independently and as a member of a small team to produce research products according to set deadlines.
Attend team meetings every 2 weeks and schedule and lead meetings with community organizations, as appropriate.
Expected commitment: an average of 5 hours/week for 8-10 weeks.

Summer projects begin in July. Fall projects begin in September. Approximately 15 student volunteers are needed as Research Associates.
Summer and Fall project topics include:

Evaluating the impact of a Hamilton arts magazine (involves ethics review, survey design and analysis, literature review, policy analysis)
Assessing the feasibility of implementing a specific poverty reduction strategy (involves an environmental scan and possible interviews)
Best practices for engaging parents of children in grades 6-8 regarding post-secondary education possibilities for their kids (involves literature review, ethics review, focus groups)
Evaluating the impact of partnerships between Neighbourhood Hubs and post-secondary institutions
Determining donation patterns of young adults and how to attract young adult donors to social services (involves literature review, possible focus group) […]

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