IUSRS

IUS Scholars take part in a workshop at McMaster.All applicants to the 2017 IUSRS program have been contacted via email. If you are an applicant who has not received an email from the program, please contact us at iusrs@mcmaster.ca.

 

Indigenous undergraduate students are invited to apply for a summer initiative – the Indigenous Undergraduate Summer Research Scholars program (IUSRS) – that gives them a taste of graduate student life at McMaster.   

IUSRS is a program within the McMaster Indigenous Research Institute (MIRI) with support from Indigenous Student Services, the Indigenous Studies Program, and the School of Graduate Studies.

Indigenous Undergraduate Summer Research Scholars
Online Student Application now open
 »

To apply, you will need ONE Reference Letter – from the community or an academic reference – to accompany your application. For full details, please download the Reference Letter Template.

Students will

  • experience hands-on research
  • take part in a series of academic workshops
  • meet new friends
  • enjoy culturally relevant activities and events
  • connect with local communities
  • enjoy the campus experience by living at McMaster for the duration of the program (optional)

What is the McMaster IUSRS course?

It is a summer research opportunity for 15 Indigenous undergraduates who want to learn more about the graduate school experience. The McMaster School of Graduate Studies is working with the Indigenous Studies Program to deliver this initiative.

What is the "graduate school experience"?

Many students choose to continue their education after achieving their undergraduate degree. To attain a Master's or Doctoral (PhD) degree, students often take part in research activities or a major project. As a graduate student, they work with a supervisor – a professor at the University – and often, other graduate students or postdoctoral fellows.

I'm not sure if I want to go to graduate school. Is this opportunity for me?

Yes! The IUSRS introduces you to the world of research and what is expected from students in graduate degree programs.

Do I need to be an Indigenous student to apply to the IUSRS course?

Yes.

I'm not a student at McMaster. Can I still apply?

Yes. The course is open to any undergraduate student attending a university in Canada.

I just finished my undergraduate degree, but I'm starting a Master's or professional degree in September 2017. Can I apply?

Yes.

How do I join the IUSRS?

You must apply online. Students who are invited to take part as IUS Scholars will be contacted beginning March 30, 2017.

How do you choose who gets in to the course?

Students will be chosen by a selection committee.

When does the IUSRS start?

The course starts on May 23 and will run for eight weeks – until July 23, 2017.

How much does it cost?

The course is free for students who are accepted. Students who take part in the IUSRS will receive $5,000.

Where will I live during the course?

All IUS Scholars will be offered room and board at McMaster University, but students are welcome to live off campus.

What will I be doing as an Indigenous undergraduate scholar?

You will work under a Faculty supervisor, who is a professor at McMaster University. You may work on an existing research project, a new individual research project or you may take part in another scholarly approach that fits the area of research where you will be working.

Do I have the opportunity to choose what type of research I will be doing?

On the application, you have an opportunity to identify what areas of research interest you. 

Will I be offered any other opportunities during my time as an IUS Scholar?

Yes! You will have a chance to take part in workshops covering a range of topics, including:

    • research ethics
    • community-engaged research with Indigenous populations
    • scholarly communication
    • time and project management
    • ePortfolios, social media
    • leadership development
    • life in graduate school and beyond

You will also have a chance to take part in community-based social activities in Hamilton and the surrounding area, including Six Nations of the Grand River Territory and New Credit reserves.

I would like more information. Who should I contact?

Send us an email.

Steven Brown

Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour
stebro@mcmaster.ca

 About

Steven Brown is the director of the NeuroArts Lab and an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. He got his PhD in the department of Genetics at Columbia University in New York, and did postdoctoral research at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, and Simon Fraser University in Vancouver. His research deals with the neural basis of the arts, including music, dance, acting, drawing, aesthetics and creativity. He is co-editor of two books: “The Origins of Music” (MIT Press) and “Music and Manipulation” (Berghahn Books)."

Visit the Neuro Arts Lab to learn more about Steven Brown.

 Over the eight week research period, an IUS Scholar will:

  •  Participate as a contributor to an ongoing research project

Name of the research project and a brief description:

 “The Psychology of Storytelling”

This study examines how plot structure influences the degree of embodied content of improvised stories. The experiment consists of trials of improvisational storytelling that are prompted by wordless 3-frame comic strips. The independent variable is the degree of embodied content of the presented story: the content will vary from being highly embodied – involving characters engaging in social interactions – to being characterless and non-embodied, for example scenes of natural phenomena like avalanches. A critical intermediate condition is examined, exemplified by the scene of a tornado approaching a city, where no people are explicitly shown but in which embodied consequences are strongly implied. These “character-implied” scenarios are the most interesting test cases since they reveal whether storytellers employ an embodied perspective as a default mode, even when characters are not visible. The improvised stories will be analyzed for their content features. The major aim will be to characterize how the storyteller conceptualizes the story and uses the elements in it to convey something that is either embodied or not as a function of the implied content.

What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar? 

  •  Either data collection or data analysis in the lab.

What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

  • A basic background in cognitive psychology. Previous work in experimental psychology is not required by would be useful as well as coursework in statistics.

What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

  • Laboratory Research

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Graeme Luke 

Physics & Astronomy
luke@mcmaster.ca

About

Graeme Luke received his PhD (Physics) in 1988 from the University of British Columbia after completing his BASc (Engineering Physics) at Queen's University in 1984. Following his PhD, he spent 3 years as a postdoctoral fellow at Columbia University in New York where he continued on as an Assistant and Associate Professor. Dr. Luke moved to McMaster University in 1998.

Dr. Luke is a Fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research in their Quantum Materials Program and a Fellow of the American Physical Society.

Visit the Luke Group to learn more.

Over the eight-week research period, an IUS Scholar will:

  • Participate as a contributor to an ongoing research project

Name of the research project and a brief description:

Growth and Characterization of Quantum Materials

The student will synthesize single crystals of new materials with novel magnetic and/or superconducting properties.  They will learn to operate our crystal growth furnaces, perform x-ray crystal structure determination and make magnetic measurements with our SQUID magnetometers.

What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar? 

  •  They will work in a research group with several undergraduate students as well as graduate students and a postdoctoral researcher.

What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

  •  Ideally they should be enrolled in an undergraduate physics program or a related field.

 What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

  • Laboratory Research

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Paul McNicholas

Statistics
paulmc@mcmaster.ca

About
Paul McNicholas is the Canada Research Chair in Computational Statistics and a Professor in the Department of Mathematics & Statistics at McMaster University. His research focuses on computational statistics, and he is at the cutting edge of international research on mixture model-based clustering and classification. Current research includes work on non-Gaussian mixtures, big data analytics, and clustering in the presence of outlying or spurious points. Paul is also interested in applied problems and, especially, in how statistics are used to support (or attack) important political and societal decisions.

Over the eight week research period, an IUS Scholar will:

  •  Carry out independent work under my supervision

If an IUS Scholar will be pursuing independent work, what potential topics are you willing to supervise?

  • The student will investigate the application and use of statistics as they relate to Indigenous communities in Canada.

What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar?

  •  Come to the lab in the morning. Work in a collaborative environment -- there will be other students there, including other undergraduate students. Meet with supervisor weekly, or perhaps more often.    

What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

  •  Only very basic knowledge of statistics is required at the outset. An interest in how statistics are used in relation to Indigenous communities in Canada is key.

--

Paul Ayers

Chemistry & Chemical Biology
ayers@mcmaster.ca 

About
Dr. Paul Ayers completed undergraduate training in chemistry, physics, and mathematics at Lipscomb University before moving to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to study theoretical chemistry under the direction of Dr. Robert Parr, earning his PhD in 2001. After working at Duke University as a postdoctoral fellow with Dr. Weitao Yang, he moved to McMaster University as a professor, where he is currently the Canada Research Chair in Theoretical Chemistry and a University Scholar. His research focuses on developing new mathematical and computational tools for describing and predicting chemical reactivity and developing accurate and efficient tools for molecular electronic structure. Perhaps the most unconventional facet of his research is its emphasis on developing tools for understanding, at a qualitative level, chemical phenomena. Most his research is incorporated in the HORTON quantum chemistry software package, which his group develops together with Prof. Toon Verstraelen at Ghent University (Belgium).

Visit the Ayers Group for more information.

Over the eight-week research period, an IUS Scholar will:

  • Carry out independent work under my supervision 

Name of the research project and a brief description:

My research is on the use of quantum mechanics to describe chemical phenomena. Of particular interest is the way one can use precise computational results to obtain qualitative insight, that is, how one can interpret the numbers produced by computers in the chemical language of atoms and bonding. Specifically, I would be interested in quantifying electronegativity and atomic charges. We have preexisting expertise on these topics, but there is ample opportunity to push our previous research in new directions.

What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar?

  • People in my research group work (very) flexible hours, but after they start work, typically they would first check the status of their calculations, and then set up new calculations based on those results. After that, there would be some time devoted to reading/learning/discussing, and perhaps (1 or 2 times/week) a discussion meeting either with the entire research group or a subgroup thereof. Typically before the day is done, one checks to be sure that all the calculations are still going well, and analyzes any calculations that have completed.

What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

  • Students working for me should have taken as much chemistry, mathematics, and physics as possible. It is helpful (but not expected) if they have prior experience in computer programming, as if they do, their project can be more interesting.  

What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

  • Laboratory Research
  • Web-based or library/archive-based research

--

Robin Cameron

Biology
rcamero@mcmaster.ca

About
Robin Cameron, Professor, is a plant biologist interested in understanding how plants use their immune systems to defend themselves from infectious diseases. Plants have a number of different immune pathways that allow them to resist different types of disease. In Dr. Cameron’s lab they study the molecular mechanisms that allow a plant to perceive that it has been invaded by a bacterial pathogen and then to initiate the appropriate defense to that pathogen. The long-term goal of her research is to use knowledge of plant immunity mechanisms to improve defense to disease in crop plants and therefore reduce our reliance on pesticides while still producing enough food.  

Over the eight-week research period, an IUS Scholar will:

  • Participate as a contributor to an ongoing research project

Name of the research project and a brief description:       

Improving disease resistance in Ontario’s greenhouse vegetable industry

My research group is interested in understanding how plants use their immune systems to defend themselves from infectious diseases. Plants have a number of different immune pathways that allow them to resist different types of disease. In my lab we study the molecular mechanisms that allow a plant to perceive that it has been invaded by a bacterial pathogen and then to initiate the appropriate defense to that pathogen. The long-term goal of my research is to use knowledge of plant immunity mechanisms to improve defense to disease in crop plants and therefore reduce our reliance on pesticides while still producing enough food.

We know that certain non-toxic compounds are involved in the signal transduction pathways that lead to plant defense to pathogens. This work has been done in model plants like Arabidopsis, but not in many crop plants. The student will join my graduate student in a project to determine which environmentally-friendly compounds that induce resistance in Arabidopsis, also induce disease resistance in cucumber plants. This information will be used to create formulations that Ontario greenhouse growers can use to protect their cucumber crops from disease without using harmful pesticides. Depending on our success with cucumber this summer, we may also have time identify compounds that induce resistance in tomatoes, as these are also a major greenhouse crop in Ontario.

What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar? 

  • At first the student will learn how to grow the plants and bacterial pathogens. While their plants are growing, they will have time to read relevant literature on plant defense and learn some molecular biology techniques such at RT-PCR. When their plants have matured (3 weeks of age), they will learn how to infect them and quantify the strength of the plant defense response using microbiology techniques to measure how well the bacteria grow in the plant. They will perform RT-PCR to examine which defense genes are expressed in the plant to provide clues as to which type of resistance response has been activated.

What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

  • Completion of 2nd year in a biology program with some knowledge of genetics, molecular biology and plant biology.

What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

  • Laboratory Research

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Juliet Daniel

Biology
danielj@mcmaster.ca

About
Dr. Juliet Daniel is a Professor and Cancer Biologist in the Department of Biology at McMaster University, Canada. Her research expertise is cell-cell adhesion and signaling through transcription factors, and how their malfunction contributes to cancer. Indeed, Dr. Daniel’s research in cancer biology led to her discovery and naming of a new gene “Kaiso”, coined from the popular Caribbean music “calypso”. Her team is currently focused on the aggressive and difficult to treat triple negative breast cancers, TNBC, that are most prevalent in Hispanic women and young women of African ancestry compared to other ethnicities despite a lower incidence and lifetime risk of breast cancer. Since socio-economic status does not fully explain the racial disparity in TNBC prevalence and mortality, Dr. Daniel seeks to identify unique DNA mutations or markers on cells that may explain this racial disparity and which can be developed for diagnostic tests or therapeutics for women worldwide regardless of ethnicity.

Over the eight-week research period, an IUS Scholar will:

  •  Participate as a contributor to an ongoing research project and carry out independent work under my supervision

Name of the research project and a brief description:

"Project title: Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying Kaiso's role in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC).

We are trying to elucidate the molecular genetic and epidemiological factors that contribute to the high incidence of the often fatal TNBC in women of African ancestry."

 If an IUS Scholar will be pursuing independent work, what potential topics are you willing to supervise?

  •  We would like the student to continue a project that we initiated last year with our Indigenous student. That projects seeks to determine the Breast cancer incidence rates in Indigenous Communities in Ontario and across Canada and to identify factors that limit/restrict access to healthcare in their communities.

What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar?

  • The student will plan and execute their own experiments each day after consultation and guidance from myself and a senior graduate student assigned to them. The student will be required to make their own reagents when necessary. The student will develop research competencies in cell culture and at least two of the following molecular cell biology techniques: PCR, immunoblotting, DNA and protein gel electrophoresis, immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence. The student will also be expected to complete and maintain a thorough lab report book that summarizes what they did and the results they obtained each day. For epidemiological studies the student will learn how to conduct searches of primary articles and how to review and synthesize a coherent summary of the literature. They will also learn to prepare and submit a human ethics application, how to conduct community research and how to analyze the data.

What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

  •  Ideally the student should have completed at least two years of an undergraduate program in Biology, Biochemistry, Life Sciences or related fields. Some previous laboratory experience would be an asset and minimize the amount of initial training required but it is not mandatory.

What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

  • Laboratory research
  • Community-based research
  • Web-based or library/archive-based research

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Allison Williams

Geography & Earth Sciences
awill@mcmaster.ca

About
Allison Williams is a Full Professor in the department of Georpgraphy and Earth Science. Her work involves applying the idea of cultural competency to a set of universal guidelines for caregiver-friendly workplaces given the importance and significance of Indigenous/First Nations cultures in Canada. She has experience working with Indigenous/First Nations communities when invited. Specifically, she has been invited to do program evaluation work for a number of Friendship Centres in urban Canada. Allison Williams is a health geography with broad interests in applied research. Her current research area is in the area of worker-carers, who are not only involved in paid labour but also provide unpaid care giving to elderly and adult family and friends.  She works with a number of cultures, including Indigenous/First Nations, Vietnamese, Mandarin-speaking Chinese, as well as Dutch.                                                                 

Over the eight week research period, an IUS Scholar will:

Participate as a contributor to an ongoing research project Cultural Competency Work   

Name of the research project and a brief description:

We have created a set of guidelines for employers to implement specific to making their workplace inclusive and accommodating for worker-carers, who are individuals who are working in the paid labour force while also providing family caregiving, in the form of eldercare or adult care for dependants.  These guidelines, together with the various dissemination/diffusion/marketing tools (knowledge mobilisation) , need to be adapted to be culturally competent for indigenous First Nations employers/companies.  This will be the focus of the research.     

What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar? 

The student will be working with a team of researchers, made up of undergraduate summer students, graduate students and academic faculty in realizing the above work. Face to face meeting, followed by intranet research, reading and applying a cultural competency framework and tools to the guideline and the knowledge mobilisation tools. Create a strategy to disseminate the KM tools across Canada.   

What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

Ideally, should have a good understanding of indigenous/First Nation culture(s).  Some training or understanding of cultural competency.  Willingness to learn and network.   

What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

  • Community-based research
  • Web-based or library/archive-based research        

Christopher Anand

Computer Science
anandc@mcmaster.ca

About
Dr. Anand, Associate Professor, has a PhD in Mathematic from McGill University, has worked in industry and collaborated with industrial partners on Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Scientific Computing.  For over a decade he has worked with teachers and McMaster students to develop a K-12 CS Outreach program.

Over the eight-week research project, a Summer Scholar will:

  • Carry out independent work under my supervision.

If an IUS Scholar will be pursuing independent work, what potential topics are you willing to supervise?

  • I would like to supervise a student who wants to understand the barriers to native students pursing education in Computer Science or areas of Engineering, Science or Business which depend on knowledge of Computer Science. This is, by far, the greatest area of employment growth, and our existing efforts in promoting CS education have not had as much success in first-nations as in the general urban population.

What would a typical day look like for an IUS Scholar?

  • For a few days, the student will go to schools with the rest of the team to understand the existing program, and read research summaries prepared by previous research students. (Note that we have been going to JC Hill in Oshweken, and would hope to schedule a visit to correspond with the start of research.) In the second phase the student would read academic and other articles describing current knowledge, develop and administer a phone survey of native educators (and possibly students and other stakeholders) to understand the barriers to CS education. In the third phase, the student will formulate a plan and explain it to the rest of the team, and in the fourth phase, the student will get help from implementing some aspect of the plan.  Note that we are already planning to implement remote programming help, and it may be possible to make this feature more useful based on the students research. Alternatively, the student may propose other tools to aid in distance education, like lesson plans including video introductions aimed at teachers. But interventions beyond the scope of the summer project would also be welcome.

What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

  • Student must be committed to learning CS themselves.

What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

  • Community-based research
  • Web-based or library/archive-based research
  • Getting help from the rest of the team in learning CS and in implementing new or improving existing activities.

What other details would you like a prospective student to know when they are considering an application to work with you?

  • Our outreach program introduced 5400 K-12 students to CS in 2016.

 --

Lydell Wiebe

Civil Engineering
wiebel@mcmaster.ca

About
Dr. Wiebe, Assistant Professor, is developing tools and educating people to meet the structural engineering challenges of an urbanizing world. His research and teaching focus on steel structures and earthquake engineering. You can find more information at http://www.eng.mcmaster.ca/civil/facultypages/wiebe.htm, or check out some of his latest activities on Twitter @LydellWiebe.

Over the eight-week research project, a Summer Scholar will:

  • Participate as a contributor to an ongoing research project

Name of project and a brief description

  • The work could go in two different directions, with the relative weight of each depending on the student’s interests and the research group’s needs.
    1. My ongoing research projects are in the area of earthquake engineering, with graduate students investigating different construction techniques that reduce earthquake damage without significantly increasing initial costs. We do large-scale testing of building components and often need help to set up and run tests.
    2. I am interested in applying my expertise in structural engineering and education to issues affecting Canada’s First Nations, and I also recognize that I need to learn more about these issues if I want to be an effective partner. I would love to have a student teach me and my group about how our work intersects with indigenous affairs, brainstorm with us about initiatives we could take, and potentially help to develop connections with indigenous communities (e.g. Six Nations).

    What would a typical day look like for an IUS Scholar?

    • For days spent on direction #1, the student would work closely in the lab with a graduate student mentor on that student’s project. In direction #2, the student’s day would be more independent, gathering and organizing references, brainstorming with my team, and preparing a presentation and report. In both cases, the student would be invited to large biweekly meetings of graduate students and professors working in structural dynamics and earthquake engineering.
    • Students will need a strong sense of initiative and a willingness to do things for the first time. No technical background is required, but work in direction #1 would be enhanced by background knowledge in engineering, while work in direction #2 would be enhanced by background knowledge in the social sciences and/or personal experience with nearby First Nations.

    What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

    • Students will need a strong sense of initiative and a willingness to do things for the first time. No technical background is required, but work in direction #1 would be enhanced by background knowledge in engineering, while work in direction #2 would be enhanced by background knowledge in the social sciences and/or personal experience with nearby First Nations.

    What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

    • Laboratory research
    • Community-based research
    • Web-based or library/archive-based research

     --

    Sarah Dickson

    Civil Engineering
    sdickso@mcmaster.ca

    About
    Sarah Dickson is an Associate Professor and the Associate Chair in the Department of Civil Engineering at McMaster University, the Director of the Water Without Borders programme - a collaborative graduate diploma between McMaster University and the United Nations University Institute for Water, Environment and Health (UNU-INWEH), and the Director of the McMaster Water Network. Dr. Dickson’s research program employs physical-human systems modeling to integrate the technical, political, and social aspects of community water security focusing on rural, remote, and marginalized communities, and particularly Indigenous communities. She has 21 years of technical experience in the field of groundwater protection through incorporating the effects of resource development (e.g. agriculture, fracking, deep nuclear waste storage) with the mechanisms of chemical and particle transport in these environments. She received an Early Research Award in 2009 from the Province of Ontario for her work in this field. Over the past 11 years, she has supervised 24 graduate students to completion, with an additional three currently under her supervision. She has raised approximately $1.7 million in research funding from the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), the Canadian Water Network (CWN), the Ontario Research Fund (ORF), and a number of private industries.    

    Over the eight week research period, an IUS Scholar will:

    • Participate as a contributor to an ongoing research project            

     Name of the research project and a brief description:

    "The research project, titled Authentic Indigenous Research Partnership, aims to explore the socio-cultural, and socio-political factors related to the access and management of clean water for First Nations on-reserve towards engaging in an ‘Authentic Indigenous Research Partnership’. A critical component of this project is to educate academics, industry, and government regarding Indigenous peoples’ rights and holistic perspectives on water and the existing systemic barriers such as inadequate resources and an unsupportive legal framework. A community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach is proposed towards an equitable engagement of First Nations as partners & knowledge brokers in developing community- centered and community relevant water leadership.

    As this research is truly trans-disciplinary in nature, the student will be working with a team of at least three other student researchers this summer, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, and will be co-supervised by Dr. Nancy Doubleday from the faculty of Humanities."                

    What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar?

    • The student will be working with a team of four students to conduct community-based research in the form of surveys, focus groups, key informant interviews to determine the needs and vision of the Six Nations community surrounding water. Additionally, this team of students will build water-related educational and outreach material for youth in the community. Therefore, a typical day will vary, from being in the community gathering data, to being on campus analyzing the data or developing outreach/educational material. It is our vision that the team-based approach, together with the diversity of supervisors will create an excellent learning environment for all involved.       

    What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

    • The successful candidate will have strong interests in any aspect of water, whether it be physical or social. As this is a team-based transdisciplinary project, and the goal is to learn from each other, any academic background is acceptable so long as you are interested in sharing your knowledge and learning from others.

    What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

    • Fieldwork
    • Community-based research

     

    Vanina Dal Bello-Haas

    Physiotherapy
    vdalbel@mcmaster.ca

     

    About
    Vanina Dal Bello-Haas, PT, PhD is Assistant Dean (Physiotherapy) and Associate Professor, School of Rehabilitation. Vanina is a physiotherapist, educator, and researcher with extensive experience in the assessment and management of people with neurodegenerative diseases and older adults.

    Visit the School of Rehabiitation Science website

    Over the eight-week research project, a Summer Scholar will:

    • Participate as a contributor to an ongoing research project

    Name of project and a brief description

    Working with the Principal Investigator and Research Study Coordinator, the Student Research Assistant will assist the research team on one of several research projects focused on older adults e.g., the Goldies2Home, dementia care, Active Across the Ages program evaluation, Day Hospital.

    What would a typical day look like for an IUS Scholar?

    • general study support, including: data entry, data cleaning, literature reviews, document/presentation development and review, as well as other general office-based and research tasks
    • assist with data collection and/or analysis; participation in research team meetings

    What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

    • interested in learning, excellent organizational skills, attentive to detail, have strong problem-solving ability and written and verbal communiation skills;
    • superior computer skills, including the ability to effectively use multiple applications, and technology skills.
    • experience or interest in health care and older adults would be an asset.

    What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

    • Community-based research
    • Web-based or library/archive-based research

     

    --

    M. Constantine Samaan

    Department of Pediatrics
    samaanc@mcmaster.ca

    About
    Dr. Samaan, Associate Professor, leads the Pediatric & Adolescent Type 2 Diabetes Program at McMaster Children's Hospital. In this role, he has had the privilege of working with families and leaders in indigenous health services in our region. He recognizes the needs of the communities to build a critical mass of individuals from the communities that can serve the clinical and evaluation needs of health programs and initiatives.

    The working environment is quite collaborative, and students from across campus at undergraduate and graduate levels enjoy the breadth and depth of the bench-to-bedside approach of the research program.

    Visit the McMaster Department of Pediatrics for more information about Dr. Samaan

    Over the eight-week research project, a Summer Scholar will:

    • Participate as a contributor to an ongoing research project

    Name of project and a brief description

    The student will review the current evidence on pediatric type 2 diabetes in indigenous children and youth in North America. the student can also choose to participate in bench research working on samples from children with type 2 diabetes.

    What would a typical day look like for an IUS Scholar?

    • The Summer Scholar will meet initially with a senior Health Sciences Librarian to design a search strategy to the research question. They will also join the research group (clinical and bench) at different times during the week, and will participate in weekly research group meetings.

    What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

    • The Summer Scholar that may find this opportunity interesting is one with an interest in child health. The applicant with a background in Health or Life Sciences or have bench research experience may also excel in this opportunity. Please note that if you choose to pursue the bench component (not mandatory), there will be staff supporting you on the bench.

    What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

    • Laboratory research
    • Web-based or library/archive-based research

    Note: The bench component is not mandatory 

    --

    Jennifer Stearns

    Medicine
    stearns@mcmaster.ca

    About
    Dr. Jennifer Stearns, Assistant Professor, studies microbial community succession in the infant gut. Her approach involves mainly human cohorts and integrates molecular methods, microbial culture and bioinformatics to study how the microbiota contributes to infant development and long term health. Dr. Stearns is the Farncombe Family Chair in Microbial Ecology and Bioinformatics and her research profile can be found here

    Visit the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute for more about Dr. Stearns

    Over the eight-week research project, a Summer Scholar will:

    • Participate as a contributor to an ongoing research project

    Name of project and a brief description

    • In partnership with the Six Nations Reserve, a dietary trial is underway to study how a return to traditional foods affects the health and microbiota of indigenous individuals. The Healthy Roots study will look at clinical indicators of cardio-metabolic health from the blood and microbes in the stool of individuals before, during and after a dietary intervention trial. The student would be participating in aspects of microbial research in a basic research lab.

    What would a typical day look like for an IUS Scholar?

    • The student will be taught laboratory techniques such as DNA extraction, bacterial culture and biochemical assays as well as some data analysis techniques. A typical day will involve a portion of his or her time being spent at the lab bench and the rest at the computer.

    What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

    • Our student will require basic lab safety training (which we can provide) as well as some familiarity with excel or other computer software.

    What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

    • Laboratory research 

     --

    Deborah Sloboda

    Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology and Pediatrics           
    sloboda@mcmaster.ca

    About
    "Dr Sloboda holds a Canada Research Chair in Perinatal Programming and is an Associate Professor in the Dept of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences at McMaster University, and is an Associate member of the Depts of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Pediatrics. Dr Sloboda's laboratory investigates early life impacts on maternal, fetal and placental development and how this mediates the risk of non-communicable disease later in life. Her experimental studies investigate maternal nutrient manipulation on maternal pregnancy adaptations, including the microbiome, placental inflammation and offspring reproductive and metabolic function.  In community based health projects, Dr Sloboda Sloboda engages with expectant mothers and services that support pregnant women. In this regards, her Mothers to Babies Study aims to develop a community-based formative knowledge transfer and work program of intervention, to improve diet, and body composition of women before and after conception.

    Please see www.slobodalab.com for more information, or on Twitter @Sloboda_Lab"

    Over the eight week research period, an IUS Scholar will:

    Participate as a contributor to an ongoing research project            

    Name of the research project and a brief description:

    Mothers to Babies Study (M2B): an interdisciplinary community health research project located in Hamilton, focused on maternal health during pregnancy. M2B participants include Hamilton-area expectant mothers, their support networks, the clinicians and community workers that interact with and advise those expectant mothers, and other stakeholders in the community.

    What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar?

    A summer student would be working under the daily supervision of one of the study’s co-investigators, postdoctoral research fellow Dr Luseadra McKerracher. The study is currently evaluating baseline health and nutritional knowledge in expectant mothers across Hamilton, through the implementation of a questionnaire. Potential questionnaire respondents will be contacted through community centres offering services to pregnant women living in high-stress, high-poverty, food-insecure Hamilton neighbourhoods. The student will accompany Dr McKerracher on visits to centres and also will use software to collate and evaluate some of the data collected. There will likely also be some opportunity to participate in co-writing tasks.         

    What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

    Applicants should be engaging in BA or BSc studies that have a health context. No specific skills are required although applicants should be comfortable working with people and be flexible in their work hours. A car is not a necessity, but would be helpful.                

    What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

    • Community-based research

    Daniel Coleman

    English & Cultural Studies     
    dcoleman@mcmaster.ca      

    About
    Daniel Coleman is a Full Professor in department of English and Cultural Students. He teaches and carries out research on Canadian literature, critical race studies, community engaged narrative arts, and indigenous-settler relations.         

    Over the eight week research period, an IUS Scholar will:  

    • Participate as a contributor to an ongoing research project           

    Name of the research project and a brief description:

    • Two Row Research Partnership- student will engage in archival research in Haudenosaunee tradition and culture at Deyohahahge Indigenous Knowledge Centre on Six Nations territory. Student will need a car as there is no public transportation to Six Nations.            

     What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar?

    • Filing, scanning, and writing summaries on archive materials, both hard copy and on screen. Also regular contact and consultation w traditional knowledge holders.  

    What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

    •  Writing, analysis, critical reading skills. Historical knowledge, especially of Indigenous history. Respectful and courteous interaction with elders.                                  

    What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

    • Community-based Research

     --

    Ivona Kucerova           

    Linguistics and Languages
    kucerov@mcmaster.ca          

    About
    Ivona Kucerova is an Associate Professor in the Linguistics and Languages department. She is a linguist that specializes in structural properties of typologically distinct languages. Her main expertise is in syntax and semantic, i.e., She studies how humans build sentences and how they derive their systematic meaning. Most of her current research investigates typologically diverse languages, including indigenous languages of Canada. For more info about her current projects and her lab »

    Over the eight week research period, an IUS Scholar will:  

    • Supervise students contributing to my ongoing research project or carrying out independent work under my supervision         

    Name of the research project and a brief description:

    SSHRC Insight Grant "Grammatical vs semantic features: the semantics-morphology mapping, and its consequences for syntax" (SSHRC #435-2016-1034): this project investigates structural properties of typologically diverse languages, the focus being on encoding of animacy (i.e., the fact whether something is alive or a human) in the grammar. The projects consist of data collection and theoretical evaluation of syntactic and semantic properties of human languages. Indigenous languages of Canada are in the centre of our investigation as they have a number of cross-linguistically rare properties.

    If an IUS Scholar will be pursuing independent work, what potential topics are you willing to supervise?

    • I am open to supervise any linguistic topic that would work with indigenous languages, be it the languages presented in Canada or elsewhere. I would also be happy to supervise a student who would be interested in working on designing and programming a linguistic database and other online and offline tools for data collection. 

    What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar?

    • It would depend on how much background the student would have in linguistics. A student without any background would with speakers on data collection. That would mean talking to speakers, reading grammars and other available language descriptions. The collected data would need to be entered in a database. The student would collaborate on a regular basis with the supervisor and other students working on the project. 

    What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

    •  Preferably the student should have basic knowledge of linguistics and some knowledge of an indigenous language; for the database part of the project, functional knowledge of basic programming languages is necessary      

    What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

    • Fieldwork
    • Community-based research
    • Web-based or library/archive-based research

    --

    Philip Savage 

    Communication Studies and Multimedia
    savagep@mcmaster.ca         

    About
     "Philip Savage has a PhD from York University (2006) and writes on the history, politics and culture of audiences in Canada and around the world. He teaches in the areas of Communication Research Methodologies, Media Policy and Analysis, and Professional Communication Practice.

    A long career in community media, public broadcasting, and professional media research included roles as Audience Research Head for CBC Radio (1990’s) and then in Planning and Regulatory Affairs for CBC Television and CBC.ca (early 2000’s).

    Philip Savage has been involved in public policy formation as a consultant and expert witness with the House of Commons, CRTC, Commissioner of Official Languages, Canadian Media Guild, and other community-based groups. He is a board member and active participant with the Finnish-based RIPE (Re-Visionary Interpretations of the Public Enterprise) and has contributed o major publications on digital media transformation around the world, in particular with regard to public broadcasting and public service media policy and audiences.

    Philip Savage also conducts interdisciplinary pedagogical research and instructor training workshops with the McMaster Institute for Innovation & Excellence in Teaching & Learning (MIIETL) and the Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (STLHE).

    Over the eight week research period, an IUS Scholar will:  

    • Carry out independent work under my supervision 

    If an IUS Scholar will be pursuing independent work, what potential topics are you willing to supervise?

    • News, broadcast or social media analysis and portrayal.
    • Audience engagement with media content.
    • Political mobilization through media.
    • Community engagement through media.

    What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar?

    • I would meet weekly with students to plan their work, based on an original meeting setting out the overall research plan with dates and deliverables set out in an initial meeting.
    • I would assist in fieldwork preparation, including ethics approval.
    • I would review work and suggest new and/or alternative approaches as required.
    • I would help to correct and edit preliminary and finished written work.

    What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

    • I would want the student to have had some university course work in the areas of quantitative and qualitative social research methods, especially within the Humanities or Social Sciences.

    What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

    • Web-based or library/archive-based research
    • Community and media engagement by societal groups & content analysis of news and other media texts.       

    --

    Joëlle Papillon

    French
    papillj@mcmaster.ca

    About
    Joëlle Papillon is a settler scholar interested in Indigenous literature in French; she is an Assistant Professor in the French Department, where she teaches Indigenous, Québécois, and French-Canadian literatures. In her current research, she studies the ecopolitics of contemporary First Nations writers such as Naomi Fontaine and Natasha Kanapé Fontaine. She would like to create tools and strategies to better teach Indigenous literature to non-Native students in the university context.

    Over the eight week research period, an IUS Scholar will:

    • Carry out independent work under my supervision                         

    If an IUS Scholar will be pursuing independent work, what potential topics are you willing to supervise?

    • The supervisor's main interests are as follows: Indigenous literature in French; teaching and pedagogy as relates to Indigenous literatures; relationships between humans and the natural world (animals, trees, rivers, etc.) in Indigenous literatures. Summer Scholars could also propose their own research topic on Indigenous literature in French.          

    What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar?

    • Projects in literature involve a lot of reading. Most research in this field can be done in an office, at the library or at home, with a flexible schedule. Summer Scholars should expect one or two meetings with the supervisor every week.

    What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?          

    •  Interest in Indigenous literatures ; competence in reading and analyzing texts (literary and theoretical) ; competence in summarizing ideas ; reading competence in French preferred ; interest in pedagogy preferred. Although a French-speaking Summer Scholar would be the best match, speaking or reading French is not mandatory; a non-French-speaking Summer Scholar could do research on pedagogy in an Indigenous context using sources in English       

    What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

    • Web-based or library/archive-based research

    --

    Nancy  Doubleday      

    Peace Studies
    doublen@mcmaster.ca         

    About
    Dr. Nancy Doubleday holds the Hope Chair in Peace and Health at McMaster University. As well as having expertise in ecological sciences, Nancy holds an LLB from Osgoode Hall, was called to the Bar of Ontario in 1982, and is a member of the Law Society of Canada. In her career as a lawyer she has contributed to development of international and domestic law embracing human rights, health and the environment. Examples of her experience include: early work to establish conservation easements, environmental impact assessment, and development of co-management under comprehensive claims; amending the Canadian Constitution; contributing to the establishment of the Northern Contaminants Program; linking Inuit interests with the international Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program; and participating in the University Consortium in Support of the Secretariat for the Convention on Biodiversity. She has also participated in the Working Group on Indigenous People(s) held in Geneva, the Conferences of the Parties to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources in Costa Rica and in Ottawa, and the International Whaling Commission in New Zealand, and the U.S.A., and the Finnish Initiative leading to the signing of the Arctic Environmental Protection Strategy and to the creation of the Arctic Council. She works at the interface of human rights and social justice, resilience and health to develop new syntheses and strategies for realizing peace and health, good governance and knowledge integration.Past Chair of the Cold Region Environments Commission of the International Geographical Union, and co-lead on a major International Polar Year research project addressing human experience of impacts of a changing tree line to better understand change and adaptive capacity in social-cultural-ecological systems. Professor Doubleday joined McMaster University in 2009."

    Over the eight week research period, an IUS Scholar will:

    • Participate as a contributor to an ongoing research project           

    Name of the research project and a brief description:

    Authenic Indigenous Leadership - the Indigenous Water Project with Six Nations, in cooperation with Kelsey Leonard, Bonnie Freeman, Sarah Dickson, John Preston and other team members; I am prepared to consider a wide range of possible topics from ecology, law, health, and peace, including conflict, history, and governance.. The most important criterion is that the student investigator. be passionately interest ed in the topic. A secondary concern is that the topic be practically important and/or policy relevant, but this is something we can sort out at the beginning of the session..    

    What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar?

    •  I am flexible and would arrange our schedule on a weekly basis. Research will involve coordinating with all team members and involve local travel.

    What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

    • "Research skills - basic online and library.searching.  Note taking and documenting. Journal keeping." 

    What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

    • Laboratory Research
    • Fieldwork
    • Community-based research
    • Web-based or library/archive-based research

    Vanessa Watts          

    Indigenous Studies
    wattsv@mcmaster.ca                 

    About
    "Vanessa Watts is Mohawk and Anishnaabe Bear Clan from Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory and now resides in Six Nations of the Grand River.  She is currently the Academic Director of Indigenous Studies at McMaster University with a cross-appointment in Sociology.  Vanessa received her Ph.D. in Sociology at Queen’s University.  Her research interrogates the process of inheritance in Indigenous places.  Specifically, she examines three functions of place: the spirit world, the feminine (women/land), and non-humans.

    Anishnaabe and Haudenosaunee cosmologies are premised on the understanding that land is female and further, that knowledge is locatable.  Given this, inhabitants of place participate in a process of material and spatial bestowing/inheriting.  Vanessa teaches in areas of Contemporary Indigenous Issues, Residential Schools, Indigenous Sovereignty, Indigenous Knowledge and Methodologies, Gender and Sexuality and Indigenous public policy."

    Over the eight week research period, an IUS Scholar will:  

    • Participate as a contributor to an ongoing research project           

    Name of the research project and a brief description:

    "“Working Colonial Sexualities: Indigenous Sex Workers and the Colonial Desire""

    This research will interrogate feminist approaches to agency in the sex trade industry in an effort to make space for the voices of Indigenous sex workers.  This includes a literature review of how Indigenous women’s sexualities have been (and continue to be) situated in settler colonial sites. This includes the sexual-economic relations of Indigenous women and White settlers during the fur trade as a significant example of how Indigenous women’s sexuality were systemized to suit settler colonial desires and increasingly dependent Indigenous communities.  It will also include face-to-face interviews with frontline workers who work with Indigenous sex workers."           

    What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar?

    • contributions to a literature review
    • potential for transcribing interviews and/or coding data

    What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

    • Some familiarity with Indigenous feminisms, able to work independently                       

    What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

    • Community-based research
    • Wed-based or library/archive-based research

    --

    Chelsea Gabel

    Health, Aging and Society & Indigenous Studies Program
    gabelc@mcmaster.ca            

    About
    Dr. Chelsea Gabel is Metis from Rivers, Manitoba. She is currently acting director of the McMaster Indigenous Research Institute and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health, Aging and Society with a cross appointment in the Indigenous Studies Program. Dr. Gabel has developed a broad program of research aimed at exploring Indigenous health and wellbeing through the use of digital technology. She has successfully secured two national SSHRC grants as Principal Investigator exploring the impact of digital technology on Indigenous participation, self-determination, governance and intergenerational communication.

    Learn more about Dr. Gabel's IUSRS supervisory experience.

    Over the eight week research period, an IUS Scholar will  

    •  Carry out independent work under my supervision             

    If an IUS Scholar will be pursuing independent work, what potential topics are you willing to supervise?

    • "SSHRC Partnership Development Grant ""The impact of digital technology on Indigenous Participation, Self-Determination and Governance""
    • SSHRC Insight Development Grant ""Bridging the Gap: Using Photovoice to Generate Indigenous Elder and Youth Understandings of the Importance of Intergenerational Communication"""                      

    What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar?

    • My summer student would help with project development and join me (and my research team) in meetings and calls, help write project newsletters, reports, publications and as in past summers, participate in field work and travel.

    What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

    • Qualitative research skills; good writing and communication skills (I'm also hoping to mentor and work with my student to improve and help with their writing); creativity

    What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

    • Fieldwork
    • Community-based research
    • Web-based or library/archive-based research

    --

    Tara La Rose  

    Social Work
    larost1@mcmaster.ca

    About
    Tara La Rose, Assistant Professor, School of Social Work . Her research interests focus on professional identity and work-life, and social work’s use of digital medial as a space for critical reflexivity and resistance. Her recent work includes projects considering the effects of neo-liberalism and austerity on social workers’ capacity to actualize social justice and social change goals; considerations of the intersection of professionalization, globalization, neoliberalism and social work professional identity and the power of multi-modality and digital-media-storytelling as resources for critical reflexivity and professional education. Her work engages multi-modal analysis, narrative analysis and discourse analysis in the context of critical perspectives such as post-structuralism, post-colonialism, feminist and queer theories. She is currently working on 2 research projects.  The Rediscovering Social Work Leaders Project, is a project of concordance research using historical texts from the Canadian Association of Social Workers Oral History Project to consider the evolution of social work leadership in Canada.  The Queer, Queering and Questioning project is developing Digital Modules for use in health professional education and training to promote patient centred care for LGBTQ identified communities. 

    Dr. La Rose served as a social worker in direct practice for more than 12 years from 1993 to 2004.  Her work experience includes service in the areas of community development, union organizing, child welfare, sexual assault and domestic violence care, emergency psychiatric crisis intervention and counseling in LGBTQ communities. She has participated in several community based research projects considering issue of labour and social work, work design, social service delivery and women’s unpaid caregiving. For the past 10 years she has taught at the post secondary level in a number of social service work, BSW and MSW programs. Dr. La Rose joined the School of Social Work at McMaster in July 2016 and am excited to deepen my connection to this new community.

    Over the eight week research period, an IUS Scholar will:

    • Carry out independent work under my supervision             

    If an IUS Scholar will be pursuing independent work, what potential topics are you willing to supervise?

    I have 2 projects on the go that a student could participate in.

    The QQQ is creating digital narrative for health care education related to LGBTQ populations. The Rediscovering Social Work Leaders project is studying historical oral history texts."I am a social worker. I study the relationship between social policy and social workers (and other human service professionals) experience of practice, the use of unions as a resource for social justice engagement in the social welfare sector, neoliberalism and professionalization and the use of social media, in particular digital media storytelling, as a tool for professional critique at the global level and I am beginning a project focused on social work oral histories. I am also working on a joint project called QQQ which is creating an An LGBTQ healthcare curriculum. The oral history project is currently funded through an ARB grant. I have applied for a SSHRC IDG and if this project is funded there would be more opportunities for the student to work in the genre of oral history of social workers - is the student was interested there could be an opportunity to undertake an oral history with a social worker and the student could have involvement of the nomination of the person for participation …

    What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar?

    • We would negotiate a process for engaging in the research the student want to undertake. I would arrange a formal meeting with the student once every 2 weeks. I will be teaching Tuesdays and Thursdays in the summer semester.

    What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

    • The skills the student require would depend on the project. I work in qualitative methods, particularly in multi-modal analysis, digital scholarship, narrative analysis and discourse analysis. The student would need to be interested in these areas and skills. I can provide the student with materials for independent study in any of these areas and would work with the student to develop a practical approach to analysis.                      

    What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

    • Web-based or library/archive-based research

    --

    Randy Jackson

    School of Social Work and the Department of Health, Aging and Society
    jacksr3@mcmaster.ca           

     About
    What makes it possible for people with HIV to live longer and better lives? Some insights might be found among Canada’s Aboriginal communities. Among many Aboriginal groups, HIV rates are rising, and yet many who have the virus live comparatively stable, happy and long lives.

    Randy Jackson has become an expert in understanding the long-term wellness among HIV-positive Aboriginal men. Dissatisfied with existing research, which tended to focus excessively on pathologizing Indigenous people, Jackson worked with the communities he was studying to find a different perspective. Health-care providers acknowledged the challenges of HIV in their communities, but also identified resilience among those who accessed their services. They wanted to understand this resilience better.

    Jackson continues to study how indigenous ways of knowing the world and being in the world can influence resilience. By better understanding the role of culture in the lives of people living with HIV, Jackson reveals parts of the bigger picture of the sociological facets of human health.

    Jackson teaches courses in Aboriginal Health and Wellness, and also in the Community-Based Research methods that are at the heart of his own research. This community-based approach has broad implications and potential, providing new insights into the ways resilience – not just physical, but also spiritual, emotional and mental – can be grounded in Indigenous knowledge, community and worldviews."

    Over the eight week research period, an IUS Scholar will:  

    Participate as a contributor to an ongoing research project           

    Name of the research project and a brief description:

    Will assist with a review of the literature focused on Indigenous masculinity. This literature review will inform the development of a research funding proposal exploring decolonizing masculinity. I'm also open to students who wish to explore an area of interest to them. I'm particularly interested in topics exploring Indigenous HIV/AIDS issues, but will also consider other health related topics, including diabetes, violence, Indigenous determinants of health, etc.  

    What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar?

    Able to work, with supervision, on their own (with regular meetings as schedules permit).       

    What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

    Able to summarize and synthesize information, writing, library research skills. Training provided in both summarizing/synthesizing information and in library research.          

    What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

    • Web-based or library/archive-based research

    --

    Dawn Martin-Hill       

    Anthropology
    dawnm@mcmaster.ca

    About
    "Dr. Dawn Martin Hill (Mohawk, Six Nations) holds a PhD in Cultural Anthropology and is one of the original founders of the Indigenous Studies Program at McMaster University. She is the inaugural Paul R. McPherson Indigenous Studies Chair.

    Dr. Martin Hill’s research is grounded in the principle that solution-based research in the area of Indigenous health must occur alongside building capacity for community collaborations. She has embodied this principle through her numerous community commitments: including serving as Chair of the Indigenous Elders and Youth Council to promote the protection and preservation of Indigenous Knowledge systems; serving as an expert witness on traditional medicines; and supporting reconciliation efforts to improve health services delivery to FN through the “Harmonization of Traditional Medicine” in partnership with Six Nations Health Services. While working with communities, Dr. Martin Hill has led numerous grants funded by both SSHRC and CIHR to conduct Indigenous knowledge research focused on Indigenous youth, women, language, ceremonies, traditional medicine and well-being."       

    Over the eight week research period, an IUS Scholar will:  

    Review Existing IK A/V data amongst other activities                                 

    What would a typical day look like for a Summer Scholar?

    Archiving IK A/V materials and assisting with a literature review. There is a possibility that the student could assist in a water security in Indigenous communities research project.

    What academic background, skills or related experiences are needed by an IUS Scholar under your supervision?

    • Web-based or library/archive-based research
    • Community-based research

    What sort of research environment should an IUS Scholar expect?

    • Web-based or library/archive-based research
    • Community-based research

    Working with IUS Scholars: My experience as a supervisor

    I oversaw a one-month study on Indigenous citizenship as part of my larger SSHRC Partnership Development Grant that explores the impact of digital technology on Indigenous participation and self-determination.

    I taught students how to carry out Q-sort methodology and factor analysis and coached them through the analysis of the data and development of a poster that was presented at a student conference. The students also presented a paper at an international conference in September 2016 in New Orleans, LA.

    A third student that I supervised in 2016, worked on my SSHRC Insight Development Grant that uses photovoice to examine intergenerational communication between Indigenous elders and youth. The IUS Scholar developed a community newsletter and travelled with the research team to Labrador as part of the project’s dissemination strategy to help put on a community dinner and photo exhibit.

     - Chelsea Gabel, Acting Director, McMaster Indigenous Research Institute,
    and assistant professor, Social Sciences

    How do I become an IUSRS supervisor?

    McMaster supervisors are invited to apply online »

    The deadline for applications is February 22, 2017.

    What is the Indigenous Undergraduate Summer Research Scholar course?

    It's a summer research and graduate school preparatory opportunity for Indigenous undergraduate students who may be interested in – or are planning to apply to – graduate school.

    Who is co-ordinating the IUSRS course?

    The School of Graduate Studies, in collaboration with the McMaster Indigenous Research Institute, with support from the Office of the President, Office of the Provost, and Office of Vice-President, Research.

    What is the goal?

    The IUSRS aims to provide a culturally relevant, transformational program to Indigenous undergraduate students. Also, this course will introduce Indigenous undergraduate students to the graduate experience and community at McMaster, with the aim of contributing to the success of Indigenous researchers and engaging more Indigenous graduate students in the future.

    How many Indigenous undergraduate scholars will take part in this second-year pilot?

    As many as 15 Indigenous undergraduate students will be selected to join us at McMaster University.

    How long will the course run? When does it start?

    Students will take part in eight-week internships. The 2017 program will run from May 23 to July 21.

    How will you match students and supervisors?

    A selection committee will match IUS Scholars with supervisors. Decisions will be made based on the research interests expressed by incoming students.

    Is this course open to supervisors across all Faculties at McMaster?

    Yes, IUS Scholars may engage in research and scholarship on any topic across all six faculties.

    Do supervisors provide financial support to an IUS Scholar?

    No. Each scholar will be provided a $5,000 stipend through the IUSRS course.

    What types of research / scholarship opportunities are you hoping to provide to the IUS Scholars?

    Research opportunities can include options:

      • joining a research team working on an ongoing research project
      • designing and implementing an individual research project
      • another approach that fits the discipline of study and is feasible within the scope of the program

    What additional opportunities will be offered to the IUS Scholars?

    In addition to their research component, IUS Scholars will participate in workshops and community-based activities covering a range of topics, including:

      • research ethics
      • community-engaged research with Indigenous populations
      • scholarly communication
      • time and project management
      • ePortfolios, social media, and other electronic platforms
      • leadership development
      • life in graduate school and beyond

    IUS Scholars will take part in common social activities designed to build a cohort and introduce them to Hamilton and surrounding area, including Six Nations of the Grand River Territory and New Credit reserves.

    Is the IUSRS open to current McMaster students only?

    No. Indigenous undergrads who attend any university in Canada will be eligible to apply for this course.

    Will IUS Scholars live on campus?

    The students will be offered room and board, but may choose to live off campus.

    As a supervisor, how will my research group / lab benefit from hosting an IUS Scholar?

    Supervisors will enjoy an opportunity to build the capacity of individual researchers/teams, while introducing the research experience to a potential future graduate student.

    When will I know whether I have been matched with an IUS Scholar?

    You will be contacted no later than March 31, 2017.

    I have more questions. Who do I contact?

    Email Peter Self or Andrea Cole in the School of Graduate Studies for more information.